As Amazon Web Services Blows Past $50 Billion, Will Jeff Bezos Trigger Huge IPO?

By: John Foley

Andy Jassy
Andy Jassy
Andy Jassy
Andy Jassy

As Amazon Web Services Blows Past $50 Billion, Will Jeff Bezos Trigger Huge IPO?

By: John Foley

CLOUD WARS RANKING

#2

CEO

Jeff Bezos

QUARTERLY CLOUD REVENUE
AS OF NOV. 30, 2020

$11.6 billion

With $11.6 billion in revenue in its most recent quarter, and trailing 12-month revenue of $42.5 billion, it’s hard to conceive of AWS as being at a disadvantage in the cloud. But there are a few chinks in AWS’s armor.

In this analysis of the year ahead, let’s start at what’s not working so well for AWS as a way of putting lines on the playing field.  AWS’s revenue-growth rate has been steadily declining over the past two years, from 49% in the second quarter of 2018 to 29% in the third quarter of 2020. That’s partly the law of numbers—growth gets more difficult the bigger you get. However, make no mistake: tough competition in the cloud market is a factor.

Another sore spot is that AWS came out on the losing end (not once, but twice) of the biggest and most lucrative cloud contract ever awarded, the Pentagon’s $10 billion JEDI contract, which went to Microsoft Azure. AWS continues to vigorously protest that contract award, but as recently as September 2020, the Department of Defense reaffirmed its original decision to go with Microsoft.

And while AWS is a heavyweight in cloud infrastructure, it’s not the undisputed, best-in-class leader in key verticals such as ERP, sales enablement, creative software, or databases. And innovative newcomers are jumping into market every day. Snowflake, for example.

In short, despite its impressive size, growth, resources, and clout, AWS hasn’t taken over the cloud world, at least not yet. But will it?

In looking at AWS’s recent track record, a few megatrends are working in its favor. We will dig into everything more deeply in this Special Report, but here are three foundational blocks.

 

  1. Customers are moving mountains of data into AWS. In its Q3 2020 financial results, AWS disclosed that job site Indeed.com is moving 30 petabytes of data to AWS while reducing its own data center footprint by 40%. This kind of data migration is an inexorable trend fueling AWS’s growth.
  2. Some big customers are eliminating their data centers completely. AWS CEO Andy Jassy recently tweeted his congratulations to Capital One, one of the largest bank holding companies, for closing its last data center. It’s no longer just startups and SMBs that are going all-in in the cloud. Global enterprises are doing it, too.
  3. New innovations and greater efficiencies make AWS even more compelling for trends 1 & 2 above. Case in point: The new AWS-designed Graviton2 processors promise up to 40% improved performance at lower cost. The business case for cloud infrastructure keeps getting stronger.

 

AWS is positioned to be a formidable competitor (and for many, a partner) in the year ahead, but it’s not the only game in town. Let’s look at AWS from five perspectives.

Amazon’s Unique Opportunities

Amazon

The digital transformation that is accelerating in businesses around the world due to COVID-19 plays right into AWS’s sweet spot—on-demand infrastructure that is fast and easy to deploy and scale. In the past, we talked about singular companies having spikes in activity—say, retailers on Black Friday or a bearish day in the stock market. Now, in response to the pandemic, organizations across the board are ramping up their digital and IT capabilities simultaneously—building apps, streamlining supply chains, managing inventory, teaching remotely.

In his annual letter to shareholders last spring, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos noted that hospitals, pharma companies, and research labs were all using AWS for research and patient care in the counterattack against COVID-19.  “The ability for organizations to access scalable, dependable, and highly secure computing power—whether for vital healthcare work, to help students continue learning, or to keep unprecedented numbers of employees online and productive from home—is critical in this situation,” Bezos wrote. 

Arguably, there has never been a more critical, time-sensitive use case for cloud infrastructure. Biotech company Moderna is using AWS in the development of messenger-RNA medicines, including a COVID-19 vaccine. Andy Jassy talked about that project a few months ago in a conversation with author Daniel Yergin.

“They didn’t have to buy the hardware. They didn’t need the data center. They didn’t have to build the infrastructure software,” Jassy said. “They just used our compute and our storage and our data warehouse and our machine-learning capabilities to scale up and scale down as they needed, to really in rapid fire be able to build something much faster than they otherwise would.”

Other companies have seen increased demand for their products and services—Zoom, Netflix, and Peloton among them. It may come as no surprise that each of those companies uses AWS. The world will beat COVID-19 eventually—the sooner, the better—but the intense focus on digital transformation that has been jump-started across industries is here to stay. This new norm bodes well for AWS.

At the same time, AWS is on the forefront of artificial intelligence and machine learning, as those technologies rapidly move up the curve from emerging technologies to mainstream. Tens of thousands of AWS customers—companies like Intuit, Kia, PWC, and Siemens—are using its AI/ML tools. AWS is laying the groundwork for widespread adoption with “pretrained” AI services for a range of use cases—text and document analysis, reviewing software code, fraud prevention, image and video analysis, and more.

Looking ahead to 2021, more organizations will move from test-the-water AI pilot programs to bona fide enterprise implementations, and it will be eye-opening to see what novelties and breakthroughs result. The National Football League is using AWS ML to generate what it calls Next Gen Stats, comprised of calculations of the location, speed, and acceleration for every player, on every play, on every yard of the field. Real-time data from IoT sensors is used to determine “expected rushing yards” and “expected yards after a catch.”

AWS is also paving the way for two long-term opportunities with huge potential: quantum computing, via its Amazon Braket managed service for designing quantum algorithms; and 5G/edge applications, enabled by AWS infrastructure called Wavelength Zones that are deployed in a communications service provider’s data center.

Amazon’s Challenges

Amazon

The tech industry has long tried to strike the balance between cooperation and competition, aka “coopetition.” Nowhere has that well-intentioned but extremely difficult concept been put to the test more than by AWS and parent Amazon.

The retail sector was the first to bristle at the idea of running IT operations on competitor AWS’s cloud platform, but now companies in other industries are also keeping a wary eye on AWS as it creeps into new markets. You’ve heard the phrase, “Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.” With AWS, the thinking goes, ‘Don’t feed the mouth that bites you.”

AWS offers industry-specific solutions in some 16 different industries—including automotive, financial services, healthcare, and telecom. That’s not the problem. But would-be customers get very nervous when Amazon begins to develop or acquire capabilities that are outside of its traditional space—and within theirs. Even as we were compiling this Special Report, Amazon announced the launch of Amazon Pharmacy for prescription delivery.

The issue was brought into the open earlier this year at a Goldman Sachs conference when CEO Jassy was asked about his company’s ever-expanding footprint into sectors such as healthcare and groceries. As reported by CNBC, AWS’s chief dismissed as “folklore” that Amazon kills competitors when it enters their market. That prompted a pointed response from Cloud Wars’ own Bob Evans, under the headline: “People Aren’t as Dumb as You Think.

It’s difficult to gauge just how much the Amazon Fear Factor impacts AWS, but it’s unlikely to fade as Amazon expands in all directions.

AWS faces other challenges that are in proportion to its growth and success. As customers like Indeed.com and Capital One put more data—and more business-critical data—into the AWS cloud, expectations are raised on service, support, reliability, and security. On this, AWS does not have a spotless record. As recently as Sept. 2020, AWS reportedly experienced technical issues affecting customers for several hours.

Another potential gotcha is the growing complexity of cloud environments. While AWS is a Swiss Army knife of cloud tools, it’s becoming harder and harder for IT teams to manage it all. The cloud was supposed to be easier than self-managed IT, right? That perhaps naïve view of the cloud world is being debunked as more IT teams grapple with multi-clouds and hybrid clouds, and as data governance forces them to manage data region by region. All of those AWS bells and whistles, and the associated pricing models, force a rigorous discipline.

Amazon

Amazon’s Unique Opportunities

The digital transformation that is accelerating in businesses around the world due to COVID-19 plays right into AWS’s sweet spot—on-demand infrastructure that is fast and easy to deploy and scale. In the past, we talked about singular companies having spikes in activity—say, retailers on Black Friday or a bearish day in the stock market. Now, in response to the pandemic, organizations across the board are ramping up their digital and IT capabilities simultaneously—building apps, streamlining supply chains, managing inventory, teaching remotely.

In his annual letter to shareholders last spring, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos noted that hospitals, pharma companies, and research labs were all using AWS for research and patient care in the counterattack against COVID-19.  “The ability for organizations to access scalable, dependable, and highly secure computing power—whether for vital healthcare work, to help students continue learning, or to keep unprecedented numbers of employees online and productive from home—is critical in this situation,” Bezos wrote.

Arguably, there has never been a more critical, time-sensitive use case for cloud infrastructure. Biotech company Moderna is using AWS in the development of messenger-RNA medicines, including a COVID-19 vaccine. Andy Jassy talked about that project a few months ago in a conversation with author Daniel Yergin.

“They didn’t have to buy the hardware. They didn’t need the data center. They didn’t have to build the infrastructure software,” Jassy said. “They just used our compute and our storage and our data warehouse and our machine-learning capabilities to scale up and scale down as they needed, to really in rapid fire be able to build something much faster than they otherwise would.”

Other companies have seen increased demand for their products and services—Zoom, Netflix, and Peloton among them. It may come as no surprise that each of those companies uses AWS. The world will beat COVID-19 eventually—the sooner, the better—but the intense focus on digital transformation that has been jump-started across industries is here to stay. This new norm bodes well for AWS.

At the same time, AWS is on the forefront of artificial intelligence and machine learning, as those technologies rapidly move up the curve from emerging technologies to mainstream. Tens of thousands of AWS customers—companies like Intuit, Kia, PWC, and Siemens—are using its AI/ML tools. AWS is laying the groundwork for widespread adoption with “pretrained” AI services for a range of use cases—text and document analysis, reviewing software code, fraud prevention, image and video analysis, and more.

Looking ahead to 2021, more organizations will move from test-the-water AI pilot programs to bona fide enterprise implementations, and it will be eye-opening to see what novelties and breakthroughs result. The National Football League is using AWS ML to generate what it calls Next Gen Stats, comprised of calculations of the location, speed, and acceleration for every player, on every play, on every yard of the field. Real-time data from IoT sensors is used to determine “expected rushing yards” and “expected yards after a catch.”

AWS is also paving the way for two long-term opportunities with huge potential: quantum computing, via its Amazon Braket managed service for designing quantum algorithms; and 5G/edge applications, enabled by AWS infrastructure called Wavelength Zones that are deployed in a communications service provider’s data center.

Amazon’s Challenges

The tech industry has long tried to strike the balance between cooperation and competition, aka “coopetition.” Nowhere has that well-intentioned but extremely difficult concept been put to the test more than by AWS and parent Amazon.

The retail sector was the first to bristle at the idea of running IT operations on competitor AWS’s cloud platform, but now companies in other industries are also keeping a wary eye on AWS as it creeps into new markets. You’ve heard the phrase, “Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.” With AWS, the thinking goes, ‘Don’t feed the mouth that bites you.”

AWS offers industry-specific solutions in some 16 different industries—including automotive, financial services, healthcare, and telecom. That’s not the problem. But would-be customers get very nervous when Amazon begins to develop or acquire capabilities that are outside of its traditional space—and within theirs. Even as we were compiling this Special Report, Amazon announced the launch of Amazon Pharmacy for prescription delivery.

Amazon

The issue was brought into the open earlier this year at a Goldman Sachs conference when CEO Jassy was asked about his company’s ever-expanding footprint into sectors such as healthcare and groceries. As reported by CNBC, AWS’s chief dismissed as “folklore” that Amazon kills competitors when it enters their market. That prompted a pointed response from Cloud Wars’ own Bob Evans, under the headline: “People Aren’t as Dumb as You Think.

It’s difficult to gauge just how much the Amazon Fear Factor impacts AWS, but it’s unlikely to fade as Amazon expands in all directions.

AWS faces other challenges that are in proportion to its growth and success. As customers like Indeed.com and Capital One put more data—and more business-critical data—into the AWS cloud, expectations are raised on service, support, reliability, and security. On this, AWS does not have a spotless record. As recently as Sept. 2020, AWS reportedly experienced technical issues affecting customers for several hours.

Another potential gotcha is the growing complexity of cloud environments. While AWS is a Swiss Army knife of cloud tools, it’s becoming harder and harder for IT teams to manage it all. The cloud was supposed to be easier than self-managed IT, right? That perhaps naïve view of the cloud world is being debunked as more IT teams grapple with multi-clouds and hybrid clouds, and as data governance forces them to manage data region by region. All of those AWS bells and whistles, and the associated pricing models, force a rigorous discipline.

Unique Differentiation

Amazon

Let’s talk about what makes AWS unique—and so formidable. First is its breadth of technologies. In addition to its bread-and-butter offerings—EC2, S3, EBS—there are more than a dozen AWS developer tools and SDKs, plus networking/CDN, container services, analytics, IoT, robotics, virtual reality, and serverless. It’s hard to match AWS’s sheer scope, and in the world of enterprise infrastructure, that counts. AWS also offers nearly a dozen cloud databases, including Aurora and RDS (relational/SQL), Redshift (data warehouse), DynamoDB (key value), DocumentDB (document style), Neptune (graph), and the newly launched Amazon Timestream (for time-series data).

Other cloud companies offer their own DB technologies, and those best-of-breed choices may be better than what AWS offers. Some would say it’s hardly a fair fight to put up Amazon’s Aurora database against, say, Oracle’s market-leading Autonomous Database. And given that AWS has so many different databases to develop, maintain, and support, can every one of them be best in its class? Let’s say you want to use not just one AWS database, but two, three, or more.  Can you do all the scaling and data movement and analysis that digital business requires across those various DBs with no loss of performance? The good news: With so many choices, customers are the clear winner.

Either way, the ability to mix and match AWS’s software, storage, networking, and tools as integrated services is powerful. The NFL’s Next Gen Stats example illustrates how so many different AWS components can work together. The project incorporates:

 

  • Amazon SageMaker – ML development
  • Amazon EC2 – compute
  • Amazon S3 – storage
  • Amazon DynamoDB – database
  • AWS Lambda – serverless computing
  • Amazon Cloudfront – content delivery network
  • Amazon EMR – big data platform
  • Amazon ElastiCache – in-memory data store
  • Amazon Quicksight – analytics

 

Another thing that separates AWS is scale—both its scale, with 77 availability zones in 24 geographic regions, and its ability to help customers scale their own operations. Scalability has been a CIO challenge for many years, and AWS can be part of the answer. The new Timestream database mentioned earlier can process trillions of time series events per day from industrial equipment, web traffic, etc. And Amazon says Timestream can do that up to 1,000 times faster than relational databases, at a fraction of the cost.

Trillions of time-series events. Petabytes and exabytes of data. As the saying goes: A billion here, a trillion there—pretty soon you’re talking real enterprise scale!

AWS is able to do this because it designs and builds end-to-end cloud infrastructure, from the processor all the way up to its wind-, solar-, and hydro-powered data centers. In his letter to shareholders, Bezos ticked through some of the ways AWS is more efficient than traditional, in-house data centers.

 

  • “That’s primarily due to two things—higher utilization, and the fact that our servers and facilities are more efficient than what most companies can achieve running their own data centers.”
  • “Typical single-company data centers operate at roughly 18% server utilization. AWS benefits from multitenant usage patterns and operates at far higher server utilization rates.”
  • “A study by 451 Research found that AWS’s infrastructure is 3.6 times more energy efficient than the median U.S. enterprise data center surveyed. Along with our use of renewable energy, these factors enable AWS to do the same tasks as traditional data centers with an 88% lower carbon footprint.”

 

AWS’s breadth of technologies and scale are hard to match. And in the year ahead, there will be more of both.

Amazon

Unique Differentiation

Let’s talk about what makes AWS unique—and so formidable. First is its breadth of technologies. In addition to its bread-and-butter offerings—EC2, S3, EBS—there are more than a dozen AWS developer tools and SDKs, plus networking/CDN, container services, analytics, IoT, robotics, virtual reality, and serverless. It’s hard to match AWS’s sheer scope, and in the world of enterprise infrastructure, that counts. AWS also offers nearly a dozen cloud databases, including Aurora and RDS (relational/SQL), Redshift (data warehouse), DynamoDB (key value), DocumentDB (document style), Neptune (graph), and the newly launched Amazon Timestream (for time-series data).

Other cloud companies offer their own DB technologies, and those best-of-breed choices may be better than what AWS offers. Some would say it’s hardly a fair fight to put up Amazon’s Aurora database against, say, Oracle’s market-leading Autonomous Database. And given that AWS has so many different databases to develop, maintain, and support, can every one of them be best in its class? Let’s say you want to use not just one AWS database, but two, three, or more.

Can you do all the scaling and data movement and analysis that digital business requires across those various DBs with no loss of performance? The good news: With so many choices, customers are the clear winner.

Either way, the ability to mix and match AWS’s software, storage, networking, and tools as integrated services is powerful. The NFL’s Next Gen Stats example illustrates how so many different AWS components can work together. The project incorporates:

 

  • Amazon SageMaker – ML development
  • Amazon EC2 – compute
  • Amazon S3 – storage
  • Amazon DynamoDB – database
  • AWS Lambda – serverless computing
  • Amazon Cloudfront – content delivery network
  • Amazon EMR – big data platform
  • Amazon ElastiCache – in-memory data store
  • Amazon Quicksight – analytics

 

Another thing that separates AWS is scale—both its scale, with 77 availability zones in 24 geographic regions, and its ability to help customers scale their own operations. Scalability has been a CIO challenge for many years, and AWS can be part of the answer. The new Timestream database mentioned earlier can process trillions of time series events per day from industrial equipment, web traffic, etc. And Amazon says Timestream can do that up to 1,000 times faster than relational databases, at a fraction of the cost.

Trillions of time-series events. Petabytes and exabytes of data. As the saying goes: A billion here, a trillion there—pretty soon you’re talking real enterprise scale!

AWS is able to do this because it designs and builds end-to-end cloud infrastructure, from the processor all the way up to its wind-, solar-, and hydro-powered data centers. In his letter to shareholders, Bezos ticked through some of the ways AWS is more efficient than traditional, in-house data centers.

 

  • “That’s primarily due to two things—higher utilization, and the fact that our servers and facilities are more efficient than what most companies can achieve running their own data centers.”
  • “Typical single-company data centers operate at roughly 18% server utilization. AWS benefits from multitenant usage patterns and operates at far higher server utilization rates.”
  • “A study by 451 Research found that AWS’s infrastructure is 3.6 times more energy efficient than the median U.S. enterprise data center surveyed. Along with our use of renewable energy, these factors enable AWS to do the same tasks as traditional data centers with an 88% lower carbon footprint.”

 

AWS’s breadth of technologies and scale are hard to match. And in the year ahead, there will be more of both.

Leadership

In a tech industry where executive churn is constant (see IBM, Google, SAP), AWS has the advantage of a leadership team with longevity. Back in 2008, I flew to Seattle to meet with AWS CTO Werner Vogels, who was recognized as InformationWeek’s Chief of the Year. At the time, Jassy was senior VP running AWS. Both are still at it.

In fact, by my calculation, Bezos, Jassy, and Vogels have combined for approximately 65 years with Amazon. That continuity explains how AWS has been able to keep a laser focus on the strategy they described to me 12 years ago, which holds up well to the test of time.

“If all goes as planned, Amazon’s cloud will serve as an extension of corporate data centers for new applications and overflow capacity, so-called cloud bursting,” I wrote in December 2008. “Over time, Amazon will then take on more and more of the IT workload from businesses that see value in the model. Customer-centric? What Amazon’s doing goes beyond that. Amazon’s cloud becomes their cloud.”

Jassy was promoted to CEO in 2016, which seems to have sharpened his competitive edge. “Jassy Throws Punches at Oracle,” screamed one headline, following Jassy’s comments at an AWS event in 2017.

Jeff Bezos
Jeff Bezos

More recently, there’s rumor and speculation (by Bezos’ own Washington Post, no less) that Jassy is the “clear heir apparent” to Bezos if and when the day comes for Amazon’s founder to step aside.

Jassy uses the AWS re.Invent conference as soapbox to take aim at competitors, while also highlighting the innovation pipeline. Last year, he unveiled 23 products. This year, AWS re.Invent runs from Nov. 30 to Dec. 18. Don’t be surprised if Jassy matches last year’s product blast.

AWS continues to expand its bench with leaders who bring experience in the enterprise. Oracle’s former senior VP of sales Rich Geraffo jumped to AWS in November 2020 to run Americas sales. A few months earlier, Tom Soderstrom, the respected former CTO of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, joined AWS as director of lead architects.

CTO Vogels recently published a blog post on the creation of a new virtualization architecture, called AWS Nitro System, that brings improved performance and security to EC2 instances. Customers, he wrote, always want more and better, and that means AWS will need “to invent on their behalf.”

That will be the ultimate measure of success in 2021. AWS must continue inventing at scale, so its customers can build and introduce their own industry-leading, customer-winning innovations.

Leadership

Jeff Bezos
Jeff Bezos

In a tech industry where executive churn is constant (see IBM, Google, SAP), AWS has the advantage of a leadership team with longevity. Back in 2008, I flew to Seattle to meet with AWS CTO Werner Vogels, who was recognized as InformationWeek’s Chief of the Year. At the time, Jassy was senior VP running AWS. Both are still at it.

In fact, by my calculation, Bezos, Jassy, and Vogels have combined for approximately 65 years with Amazon. That continuity explains how AWS has been able to keep a laser focus on the strategy they described to me 12 years ago, which holds up well to the test of time.

“If all goes as planned, Amazon’s cloud will serve as an extension of corporate data centers for new applications and overflow capacity, so-called cloud bursting,” I wrote in December 2008. “Over time, Amazon will then take on more and more of the IT workload from businesses that see value in the model. Customer-centric? What Amazon’s doing goes beyond that. Amazon’s cloud becomes their cloud.”

Jassy was promoted to CEO in 2016, which seems to have sharpened his competitive edge. “Jassy Throws Punches at Oracle,” screamed one headline, following Jassy’s comments at an AWS event in 2017. More recently, there’s rumor and speculation (by Bezos’ own Washington Post, no less) that Jassy is the “clear heir apparent” to Bezos if and when the day comes for Amazon’s founder to step aside.

Jassy uses the AWS re.Invent conference as soapbox to take aim at competitors, while also highlighting the innovation pipeline. Last year, he unveiled 23 products. This year, AWS re.Invent runs from Nov. 30 to Dec. 18. Don’t be surprised if Jassy matches last year’s product blast.

AWS continues to expand its bench with leaders who bring experience in the enterprise. Oracle’s former senior VP of sales Rich Geraffo jumped to AWS in November 2020 to run Americas sales. A few months earlier, Tom Soderstrom, the respected former CTO of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, joined AWS as director of lead architects.

CTO Vogels recently published a blog post on the creation of a new virtualization architecture, called AWS Nitro System, that brings improved performance and security to EC2 instances. Customers, he wrote, always want more and better, and that means AWS will need “to invent on their behalf.”

That will be the ultimate measure of success in 2021. AWS must continue inventing at scale, so its customers can build and introduce their own industry-leading, customer-winning innovations.

The Big Questions for Amazon

There are many questions for AWS, the answers to which can impact individual companies and entire industries. Let’s start at the top.

  • Will Amazon get into the auto industry? Finance? Healthcare?

  • Will AWS eat its customers’ lunches? As Amazon continues to test the boundaries that once provided a degree of separation from other industries, where does it draw the line?

  • Within the tech industry, how will companies like Snowflake and MongoDB partner with AWS one day and compete vigorously the next?

  • Will AWS compete with IBM, Google, Microsoft, Raytheon, and others in quantum computing?

  • How will AWS help its customers deal with the growing complexity of cloud infrastructure?

  • Will Andy Jassy go after Microsoft’s cloud business more aggressively? And if he does, what will he target—AI? Blockchain? Hybrid cloud management?

  • When will the migration of Big Data in the cloud shift from petabytes (which are a thousand terabytes) to exabytes (which are a thousand petabytes)? And how will AWS help its customers make that exponential leap?

The common threads to these questions are scale, complexity, customer relationships, and the competitive landscape. If challenges can be viewed as opportunities, 2021 will be a year full of big opportunities for AWS.

About The Author

I’m an independent writer and analyst covering the enterprise technology market with a focus on cloud computing and data management. As a tech journalist earlier in my career, I covered databases and enterprise software, open systems, analytics, data centers, and all aspects of the emerging cloud market (SaaS/PaaS/IaaS). More recently, I established and led editorial teams driving strategic communications at Oracle, IBM, and MongoDB.

As a thought leader in the tech industry, I have traveled around the world meeting with CIOs and CEOs; written hundreds of blog posts and magazine articles on products, strategy, and implementation; explored innovative startups; and made countless trips to Redmond and Silicon Valley.

John Foley

About The Author

John Foley

About The Author

I’m an independent writer and analyst covering the enterprise technology market with a focus on cloud computing and data management. As a tech journalist earlier in my career, I covered databases and enterprise software, open systems, analytics, data centers, and all aspects of the emerging cloud market (SaaS/PaaS/IaaS). More recently, I established and led editorial teams driving strategic communications at Oracle, IBM, and MongoDB.

As a thought leader in the tech industry, I have traveled around the world meeting with CIOs and CEOs; written hundreds of blog posts and magazine articles on products, strategy, and implementation; explored innovative startups; and made countless trips to Redmond and Silicon Valley.

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