Confounding His Critics, Larry Ellison Turns Oracle into Cloud Powerhouse

Oracle founder Larry Ellison, who says that analysts prefer Fusion HCM to Workday
Oracle founder Larry Ellison, who says that analysts prefer Fusion HCM to Workday

Confounding His Critics, Larry Ellison Turns Oracle into Cloud Powerhouse

CLOUD WARS RANKING

#6

CHAIRMAN

Larry Ellison

QUARTERLY CLOUD REVENUE
AS OF NOV. 30, 2020

$2.2 billion (est.)

To get a clear sense of where Oracle is headed in 2021, it’s essential to have a quick sense of how it got to its present spot as one of the most important and innovative tech companies in the world. Since founding Oracle in 1977, Larry Ellison has never played according to accepted tradition, never competed within acknowledged norms, never adopted conventional wisdom, and never settled for second place. In addition to charting his own course, Ellison has always played the long game, an approach that also runs counter to what most other companies do.

So don’t expect Ellison and Oracle to mimic what anyone else has done—and by all means, don’t expect him to take the road more traveled.

 

  • When “the experts” said relational databases could never become a high-volume production-grade reality, Ellison went out and built one. And today, Oracle dominates the enterprise database market.
  • When “the experts” said SAP had constructed an impassable moat around the ERP space, Ellison in fairly short order turned his database powerhouse into a database and enterprise-apps powerhouse that has a chance to be world leader in cloud ERP.
  • When “the experts” were advising tech companies to abandon the hardware business as fast as they could retreat, Ellison jumped into it by first buying Sun and then building a new type of product called an “engineered system” in which hardware and software were engineered to work together.
  • When “the experts” said no one could ever catch Amazon and Microsoft and Google in the cloud, Ellison redirected Oracle into the cloud and began a decade-long and hugely expensive to convert Oracle’s enormous IP portfolio from on-premises to the cloud.
  • When no one else either wanted to build an Autonomous Database or was able to do so, Oracle built one as its first step toward a fully autonomous cloud.

 

So where’s Oracle headed in 2021? Only Larry Ellison knows—but the one safe bet is that he and Oracle are going where no other cloud vendor has been.

Oracle’s Opportunities

Oracle

Take your pick: Oracle’s Fusion SaaS apps business is growing at 26%,  Autonomous Database at 64%, and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure at 130%. Let’s take a deeper look.

Fusion Applications

For years, those same bozo “experts” droned on about how Oracle was late to the cloud, didn’t get the cloud, wasn’t ready for the cloud, and was so hopelessly far beyond that it would never be a factor anyway.

But Ellison’s decade-long mission to rewrite Oracle’s massive portfolio of enterprise applications for the cloud is starting to pay off nicely:

Fusion ERP: Taking a Run at SAP

All of these moves point to huge potential for Oracle, but to me the most intriguing are these two: Fusion ERP and vertical-industry solutions.

As we noted in the SAP section of this Cloud Wars Top 10 Special Report, SAP currently has 42,000 on-premises ERP customers in the cloud, with 30,000 of those being “traditional” ERP and 12,000 being the modern S/4HANA version. While SAP will do everything in its considerable power to keep those 42,000 within the fold and steer them toward S/4HANA Cloud, Oracle will compete intensely for those accounts. And if it manages to peel away even 5% or possibly 10%, that would be a massive coup for Oracle.

Industry-Specific Applications

With industry-specific solutions, Ellison is surfacing a little-known but high-potential business within Oracle that for years has offered highly specialized on-premises applications in all the major industries: communications, financial services, healthcare and life sciences, retail, hospitality, and more.

Oracle will face plenty of pressure from SAP, Microsoft and to some extent Google Cloud in offering these new-wave AI-based apps, but the market is big enough to provide plenty of business for everyone. Well, at least for a while.

Huge Opportunities: Autonomous Database and OCI

Two other big opportunities for Oracle are Autonomous Database and OCI. Earlier this year, Ellison began making one of his classic moves when he began positioning Autonomous DB as part of IaaS, whereas the traditional category for cloud databases was also in PaaS.

But Ellison wanted to really pump up his OCI business, so instead of having a fairly big PaaS business with Autonomous Database within it, he just collapsed his most essential and highest-potential PaaS services into IaaS and began ignoring even the term “PaaS”.

For customers, that’s an easier cloud to consume: the infrastructure that runs all the stuff (OCI), and the applications that run your business (Fusion). And here are some of our key articles from 2020 that analyze Ellison’s moves with Autonomous and OCI:

 

Oracle’s Challenges

Safra Catz
Safra Catz

Ambition is a great thing. But as we’ve seen throughout history, overly abundant ambition can be dangerous. My biggest concern about Oracle is whether it’s overextending itself in trying to compete at every possible layer of the cloud—an initiative that’s challenging enough on its own—and that it’s doing so in direct competition against three of the world’s biggest, best-known, wealthiest, and most-powerful companies: Microsoft, Amazon, and Google.

The Market-Cap Gap

With a market cap in the range of $172 billion, Oracle is well-heeled and respected, and Ellison has proven repeatedly that he’s very willing to leverage that financial power.

But that $172 billion is only one-tenth—10%!—of the market caps of Microsoft and Amazon, with Google’s being about 7X greater than Oracle’s.

Sales Leadership

Since the untimely death of former CEO Mark Hurd over a year ago, Oracle has not had a sales leader. CEO Safra Catz is a formidable presence in the marketplace, but she’s also focused most of her time as CEO over the past several years on internal operations. Can Catz transcend her operational brilliance and be the very visible and very public face of Oracle as it faces intense and relentless competition?

Reputation, Reputation, Reputation

Oracle’s never been known as cuddly, and that’s fine—customers are buying Oracle’s mission-critical technology and expertise, not asking it to join them for a long walk on the beach. But the engagement model for cloud customers is an entirely different animal than existed in the on-premises era, and it requires an entirely different mindset. Oracle’s been working on this customer-focused new personality for a few years now, but for where Ellison wants to the company to go, that customer-success culture can’t be just good—it has to be phenomenal. This is an area whose importance to Oracle in 2021 and beyond cannot possibly be overstated. And without question, all the major players will be looking to get better and better and better at the customer-success game in the years to come—so Oracle had better take this as seriously as any technological challenge it might face.

Oracle

Oracle’s Opportunities

Take your pick: Oracle’s Fusion SaaS apps business is growing at 26%,  Autonomous Database at 64%, and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure at 130%. Let’s take a deeper look.

Fusion Applications

For years, those same bozo “experts” droned on about how Oracle was late to the cloud, didn’t get the cloud, wasn’t ready for the cloud, and was so hopelessly far beyond that it would never be a factor anyway.

But Ellison’s decade-long mission to rewrite Oracle’s massive portfolio of enterprise applications for the cloud is starting to pay off nicely:

  • for its fiscal Q1 ended Aug. 31, revenue for all of its Fusion apps (a complete suite of cloud applications) was up 26%
  • within that suite of Cloud apps, Fusion ERP revenue was up 33%;
  • it’s just launched a new Fusion CX strategy that seeks to fully exploit the interconnectedness of customer-facing apps and data with ERP apps and data (Larry Ellison Wants It All—Can Oracle Get It?);

Oracle’s Challenges

Ambition is a great thing. But as we’ve seen throughout history, overly abundant ambition can be dangerous. My biggest concern about Oracle is whether it’s overextending itself in trying to compete at every possible layer of the cloud—an initiative that’s challenging enough on its own—and that it’s doing so in direct competition against three of the world’s biggest, best-known, wealthiest, and most-powerful companies: Microsoft, Amazon, and Google.

The Market-Cap Gap

With a market cap in the range of $172 billion, Oracle is well-heeled and respected, and Ellison has proven repeatedly that he’s very willing to leverage that financial power.

But that $172 billion is only one-tenth—10%!—of the market caps of Microsoft and Amazon, with Google’s being about 7X greater than Oracle’s.

Safra Catz
Safra Catz

Unique Differentiation

Oracle

Ellison likes to say that Oracle’s the only cloud vendor that play in both the IaaS space and the SaaS layer. That’s not true—Microsoft is a big-time player in IaaS and its Dynamics 365 enterprise-apps business will do about $2 billion in revenue this calendar. And Google’s another IaaS powerhouse that’s also moving into applications—but of a very different kind than Oracle’s—at both the high end with its industry-specific solutions outlined in the Google Cloud section of this Special Report, and on the personal-productivity end with Google Workspace.

It’s certainly fair for Ellison to say that his SaaS business dwarfs the size of the apps business of either Microsoft or Google Cloud—but by the same token, their infrastructure businesses are vastly bigger than Oracle’s.

Oracle’s #1 Differentiator

Without question, Oracle’s primary differentiator is Ellison himself. His vision, his will, his appetite for risk, his strategic insights and his sheer infatuation with high-stakes competition are all part of what he brings to Oracle every single day—and don’t forget, he’s also the CTO! He’s not always right—who is?—but his fire keeps Oracle in the game even in the lean years, and his willingness to invest deeply over the long term while awaiting the perfect time to pounce—the long game—is why the company remains a top-flight competitor even after 43 years.

Autonomous Database: Nothing Like It

On the technology side, Oracle is positioning Autonomous Database as the ultimate destination for all of its customers, regardless of how they want or need to consume it. To the very best of my knowledge—and I’ve been asking around for the past 2-3 years—no other tech company has an autonomous database or anything close. So if Ellison can convince customers that what he always says about ADB is true—never goes down, is faster than anything out there, lowers risk because it patches and maintains itself automatically, frees up resources to be used elsewhere—then it could well turn out to be “the most important and most successful product” in Oracle’s history.

On top of the breakthrough technology, Oracle has also made huge leaps forward with its go-to-market plans for Autonomous Database:

Want it in the cloud? Sure—it’s cloud native.

Want it in combination with Exadata? The Exadata Cloud Service X8M is designed to handle the world’s most-demanding workloads.

Want it in the cloud and in your own data center? The awkwardly named but technologically unmatched Dedicated Region [email protected] will live in your data center and behind your firewall, and for just $500,000 per month comes with every cloud service offered by Oracle: apps, databases, analytics, security, etc.

OCI: The Foundation of Oracle’s Future

So a huge differentiator for Oracle with OCI is the way the company’s packaging it for customers: OCI runs everything and it’s the fastest and most-secure cloud infrastructure in the world, and Fusion apps are designed to run perfectly on OCI.

Two months ago, I laid this out in a piece called The Audacious Larry Ellison Flips Oracle Cloud Strategy Upside-Down:

From Oracle’s Sept. 10 earnings call, here’s Ellison making the case that when it comes to Oracle Cloud, the big dog is OCI—Oracle Cloud Infrastructure—while high-profile Oracle cloud products such as Fusion apps and cloud-native Autonomous Database are simply cogs in the great wheel of Oracle cloud infrastructure.

“We’ve got well over 7,000 Fusion ERP customers, and a lot of those customers are beginning to build data warehouses around their ERP data. Everyone does that. And they’re building those data warehouses using Oracle Autonomous Database and Oracle Analytics and the overall Oracle Cloud using Oracle infrastructure services,” Ellison said in laying out the massive integrated and interconnected opportunity he foresees.

OCI moves to center of Oracle Cloud universe

And Ellison then flipped the script to portray the formerly moribund Oracle infrastructure business as the new engine for Oracle’s growth and relevance.

“The Oracle Analytics Cloud is an Oracle infrastructure service—an OCI service. The Autonomous Database [revenue up 64% in fiscal Q1] is an OCI service. 

“So, our application customers—pretty much all of our medium and large application customers—will become, in the not-too-distant future, infrastructure customers.”

And the pie that Ellison’s baking only gets larger from there.

“So these are people that are SaaS customers are going to become infrastructure customers. On-premise database customers are going to become infrastructure customers, either in the form of the public cloud or [email protected] [Oracle cloud services set up within customers’ data centers as private clouds managed by Oracle].

Why pick Oracle over Microsoft, Amazon, Google?

“Then there are the surprises like Zoom and 8×8,” said Ellison in reference to two high-growth video-conferencing businesses that have become significant OCI customers either to handle growth in the case of Zoom or as a new preferred choice over industry leader AWS in the case of 8×8.

“I think Zoom is a great example because it proves that the Oracle Cloud is secure, reliable, high performant and economical. They picked it even though it has nothing to do with the Oracle Database, and it has nothing to do with Zoom being a SaaS customer. That was just purely an evaluation of our cloud versus Microsoft’s versus Google’s versus Amazon’s.”

Warming to the subject of Oracle cloud infrastructure taking business that until several months ago would almost never have come Oracle’s way, Ellison shifted to the car industry. 

“And another example of that is high-performance computing with car companies simulating crashes. Now, why would anyone go to the Oracle Cloud to do high-performance computing when you can go to Google or you can go to Microsoft or you can go to AWS? Well, because we’re much faster—we’re much, much faster. And therefore, they get the simulations done faster, but they’ve got to be willing to pay less,” Ellison added, using a favorite line of his to underscore that faster performance results in or should result in lower costs for the customer. 

Oracle

Unique Differentiation

Ellison likes to say that Oracle’s the only cloud vendor that play in both the IaaS space and the SaaS layer. That’s not true—Microsoft is a big-time player in IaaS and its Dynamics 365 enterprise-apps business will do about $2 billion in revenue this calendar. And Google’s another IaaS powerhouse that’s also moving into applications—but of a very different kind than Oracle’s—at both the high end with its industry-specific solutions outlined in the Google Cloud section of this Special Report, and on the personal-productivity end with Google Workspace.

It’s certainly fair for Ellison to say that his SaaS business dwarfs the size of the apps business of either Microsoft or Google Cloud—but by the same token, their infrastructure businesses are vastly bigger than Oracle’s.

Oracle’s #1 Differentiator

Without question, Oracle’s primary differentiator is Ellison himself. His vision, his will, his appetite for risk, his strategic insights and his sheer infatuation with high-stakes competition are all part of what he brings to Oracle every single day—and don’t forget, he’s also the CTO!

He’s not always right—who is?—but his fire keeps Oracle in the game even in the lean years, and his willingness to invest deeply over the long term while awaiting the perfect time to pounce—the long game—is why the company remains a top-flight competitor even after 43 years.

Autonomous Database: Nothing Like It

On the technology side, Oracle is positioning Autonomous Database as the ultimate destination for all of its customers, regardless of how they want or need to consume it. To the very best of my knowledge—and I’ve been asking around for the past 2-3 years—no other tech company has an autonomous database or anything close. So if Ellison can convince customers that what he always says about ADB is true—never goes down, is faster than anything out there, lowers risk because it patches and maintains itself automatically, frees up resources to be used elsewhere—then it could well turn out to be “the most important and most successful product” in Oracle’s history.

On top of the breakthrough technology, Oracle has also made huge leaps forward with its go-to-market plans for Autonomous Database:

Want it in the cloud? Sure—it’s cloud native.

Want it in combination with Exadata? The Exadata Cloud Service X8M is designed to handle the world’s most-demanding workloads.

Want it in the cloud and in your own data center? The awkwardly named but technologically unmatched Dedicated Region [email protected] will live in your data center and behind your firewall, and for just $500,000 per month comes with every cloud service offered by Oracle: apps, databases, analytics, security, etc.

OCI: The Foundation of Oracle’s Future

So a huge differentiator for Oracle with OCI is the way the company’s packaging it for customers: OCI runs everything and it’s the fastest and most-secure cloud infrastructure in the world, and Fusion apps are designed to run perfectly on OCI.

Two months ago, I laid this out in a piece called The Audacious Larry Ellison Flips Oracle Cloud Strategy Upside-Down:

From Oracle’s Sept. 10 earnings call, here’s Ellison making the case that when it comes to Oracle Cloud, the big dog is OCI—Oracle Cloud Infrastructure—while high-profile Oracle cloud products such as Fusion apps and cloud-native Autonomous Database are simply cogs in the great wheel of Oracle cloud infrastructure.

“We’ve got well over 7,000 Fusion ERP customers, and a lot of those customers are beginning to build data warehouses around their ERP data. Everyone does that. And they’re building those data warehouses using Oracle Autonomous Database and Oracle Analytics and the overall Oracle Cloud using Oracle infrastructure services,” Ellison said in laying out the massive integrated and interconnected opportunity he foresees.

OCI moves to center of Oracle Cloud universe

And Ellison then flipped the script to portray the formerly moribund Oracle infrastructure business as the new engine for Oracle’s growth and relevance.

“The Oracle Analytics Cloud is an Oracle infrastructure service—an OCI service. The Autonomous Database [revenue up 64% in fiscal Q1] is an OCI service. 

“So, our application customers—pretty much all of our medium and large application customers—will become, in the not-too-distant future, infrastructure customers.”

And the pie that Ellison’s baking only gets larger from there.

“So these are people that are SaaS customers are going to become infrastructure customers. On-premise database customers are going to become infrastructure customers, either in the form of the public cloud or [email protected] [Oracle cloud services set up within customers’ data centers as private clouds managed by Oracle].

Why pick Oracle over Microsoft, Amazon, Google?

“Then there are the surprises like Zoom and 8×8,” said Ellison in reference to two high-growth video-conferencing businesses that have become significant OCI customers either to handle growth in the case of Zoom or as a new preferred choice over industry leader AWS in the case of 8×8.

“I think Zoom is a great example because it proves that the Oracle Cloud is secure, reliable, high performant and economical. They picked it even though it has nothing to do with the Oracle Database, and it has nothing to do with Zoom being a SaaS customer. That was just purely an evaluation of our cloud versus Microsoft’s versus Google’s versus Amazon’s.”

Warming to the subject of Oracle cloud infrastructure taking business that until several months ago would almost never have come Oracle’s way, Ellison shifted to the car industry. 

“And another example of that is high-performance computing with car companies simulating crashes. Now, why would anyone go to the Oracle Cloud to do high-performance computing when you can go to Google or you can go to Microsoft or you can go to AWS? Well, because we’re much faster—we’re much, much faster. And therefore, they get the simulations done faster, but they’ve got to be willing to pay less,” Ellison added, using a favorite line of his to underscore that faster performance results in or should result in lower costs for the customer. 

Leadership

We’ve already talked a great deal about Ellison, so let’s look at a couple of other key players in Oracle’s stunning surge in the IaaS business. In an August analysis headlined How Larry Ellison Is Shuffling Top Execs to Spark Next-Gen Oracle Cloud based on a news article from Geekwire.com, I assessed the rise of OCI creators Don Johnson and Clay Magouryk. From that article:

Johnson said in a June 30 email to his team that he will remain at Oracle, reporting to Ellison and focusing on the company’s broader cloud mission.

“This has been the eventual plan for a long time,” Johnson wrote in the memo. “Clay was the first person I hired here at Oracle, we built OCI together and have been driving it in tandem from the start. As he’s stepped into a broadening leadership role, steering both technology and the business, it was clear that Clay is the right person to lead OCI into the future.”

In explaining his new role, Johnson signaled Oracle’s bigger ambitions.

“Oracle’s position in the cloud landscape, simplistically, is that we offer a marriage of the best cloud infrastructure, and leading data platform, together with the most pervasive cloud applications. No one else does this, or realistically, can do this as we can. The full realization of this vision is that Oracle provides the most complete cloud platform to build on and to operate your entire business.”

Oracle
Ariel Kelman

With Ellison and Catz, Oracle Will Always Be a Serious Player

Ellison’s been at Oracle for 43 years, and Catz for 21. They truly are Oracle: its intelligence, its passion, its vision, and its will. And Ellison and Catz have brought in new high-end talent to keep pushing the company forward: from the excerpt above, Don Johnson and Clay Magouryk; executive VP and CMO Ariel Kelman from AWS; and executive VP of CX Rob Tarkoff, who came from Lithium Technologies and Adobe.

In spite of those long-term tenures, Ellison and Catz are likely to be at Oracle for the foreseeable future. Here’s a comment from Catz captured by a Business Insider reporter at an Oracle press event in 2015:

“If Larry left — is it in one of his fancy cars? — I would be in the passenger seat. I’ve been on record on this. Unfortunately, if I want to get some rest, he’s more committed, more in, every day. There’s no near-term or even medium-term of him retiring. I personally think he’ll never retire. I suspect I will retire instead of him,” she said.

Leadership

Oracle
Ariel Kelman

We’ve already talked a great deal about Ellison, so let’s look at a couple of other key players in Oracle’s stunning surge in the IaaS business. In an August analysis headlined How Larry Ellison Is Shuffling Top Execs to Spark Next-Gen Oracle Cloud based on a news article from Geekwire.com, I assessed the rise of OCI creators Don Johnson and Clay Magouryk. From that article:

Johnson said in a June 30 email to his team that he will remain at Oracle, reporting to Ellison and focusing on the company’s broader cloud mission.

“This has been the eventual plan for a long time,” Johnson wrote in the memo. “Clay was the first person I hired here at Oracle, we built OCI together and have been driving it in tandem from the start. As he’s stepped into a broadening leadership role, steering both technology and the business, it was clear that Clay is the right person to lead OCI into the future.”

In explaining his new role, Johnson signaled Oracle’s bigger ambitions.

“Oracle’s position in the cloud landscape, simplistically, is that we offer a marriage of the best cloud infrastructure, and leading data platform, together with the most pervasive cloud applications. No one else does this, or realistically, can do this as we can. The full realization of this vision is that Oracle provides the most complete cloud platform to build on and to operate your entire business.”

With Ellison and Catz, Oracle Will Always Be a Serious Player

Ellison’s been at Oracle for 43 years, and Catz for 21. They truly are Oracle: its intelligence, its passion, its vision, and its will. And Ellison and Catz have brought in new high-end talent to keep pushing the company forward: from the excerpt above, Don Johnson and Clay Magouryk; executive VP and CMO Ariel Kelman from AWS; and executive VP of CX Rob Tarkoff, who came from Lithium Technologies and Adobe.

In spite of those long-term tenures, Ellison and Catz are likely to be at Oracle for the foreseeable future. Here’s a comment from Catz captured by a Business Insider reporter at an Oracle press event in 2015:

“If Larry left — is it in one of his fancy cars? — I would be in the passenger seat. I’ve been on record on this. Unfortunately, if I want to get some rest, he’s more committed, more in, every day. There’s no near-term or even medium-term of him retiring. I personally think he’ll never retire. I suspect I will retire instead of him,” she said.

The Big Questions for Oracle

  • No doubt Larry Ellison’s public proclamations about OCI being much faster than Amazon, Microsoft and Google will inspire those trillion-dollar competitors to find ways to ratchet up the performance of their cloud infrastructures. As that happens, can even Larry Ellison keep up in arms races with 3 competitors with a combined market cap of about $4.5 trillion?

  • Autonomous Database might be the most heavily hyped product Oracle has ever introduced—Ellison on a few occasions has said it will be “the most important and most successful product in Oracle’s history.” Oracle’s only recently begun to release any financial details about Autonomous Database, withholding revenue figures but noting a revenue growth rate of 64%. No, don’t get me wrong—64% growth is lovely. But since it’s a new product, the base from which that growth was generated would have been very small. So: how excited should Oracle be about that revenue growth rate for Autonomous DB? After all, OCI revenue for the same period jumped twice as fast: 130%. When will the surging demand for Autonomous DB that Ellison has touted on multiple occasions reveal itself in publicly disclosed revenue details?

  • For the past 30 years, Oracle has been challenged by hundreds of database companies, many of which swore to the world that they’d be the “Oracle killer.” Many have crashed, most are irrelevant, and the others are all lined up far below Oracle on the list of database market-share leaders. But Microsoft’s not just any fluffed-up database startup—and while it’s not claiming in any way to be the next “Oracle killer, that doesn’t mean Microsoft’s being subtle: Hey Larry Ellison: Microsoft’s #1 Priority Is Replacing Oracle Database. Will this become a truly serious challenge to Oracle’s database supremacy?

  • What will Oracle after Larry Ellison look like? Ellison is 76 and he's been driving Oracle since its founding 43 years ago. His interests are wide-ranging and passionate, and he has along the way become one of the wealthiest people on Earth. He’s given no public statement or even hint of any kind about retiring—quite conversely, Ellison’s willingness and desire to engage in increasingly high-stakes competition and innovation seems to be the ultimate attraction that keeps him bound to Oracle. But at some point, Ellison might choose to spend more time bringing rare and exotic flowers back to his Hawaiian island, or to sailboat racing, or to his restaurants and hotels, or to his art collections, his medical research, and maybe even buying and running an NBA team. And what, then, will Oracle and its future look like?

    For the past 30 years, Oracle has been challenged by hundreds of database companies, many of which swore to the world that they’d be the “Oracle killer.” Many have crashed, most are irrelevant, and the others are all lined up far below Oracle on the list of database market-share leaders. But Microsoft’s not just any fluffed-up database startup—and while it’s not claiming in any way to be the next “Oracle killer, that doesn’t mean Microsoft’s being subtle: Hey Larry Ellison: Microsoft’s #1 Priority Is Replacing Oracle Database. Will this become a truly serious challenge to Oracle’s database supremacy?

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Oracle brings its complete portfolio of public cloud services and Oracle Fusion SaaS applications into your data center so you can reduce data center costs, upgrade legacy applications using modern services, and meet your most demanding data residency and latency requirements.

About The Author

I’ve analyzed the enterprise-tech business for more than 25 years as an editorial executive and more recently as Chief Communications Officer at Oracle. I’ve written thousands of articles and columns about business innovation, strategy, leadership, disruptive technology, digital transformation, cloud computing, AI and more. In late 2016, I resigned from Oracle to launch the Cloud Wars franchise. It began with the Cloud Wars Top 10 ranking and weekly articles, and has since expanded into daily articles, a weekly newsletter, a podcast with more than 200 episodes, and now this one-of-a-kind Special Report.

About The Author

About The Author

I’ve analyzed the enterprise-tech business for more than 25 years as an editorial executive and more recently as Chief Communications Officer at Oracle. I’ve written thousands of articles and columns about business innovation, strategy, leadership, disruptive technology, digital transformation, cloud computing, AI and more. In late 2016, I resigned from Oracle to launch the Cloud Wars franchise. It began with the Cloud Wars Top 10 ranking and weekly articles, and has since expanded into daily articles, a weekly newsletter, a podcast with more than 200 episodes, and now this one-of-a-kind Special Report.

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